Georgetown Center for Children and Families Conference 2016 Recap

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Two weeks ago, children’s health advocates from across the country came together in Washington, DC for the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute Center for Children and Families Annual Conference. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for national and state advocates to share their experiences and learn from one another. This year’s conference theme was “Clear Skies or Foggy Times Ahead for Child and Family Coverage?” Topics included the future of children’s health coverage, strengthening and expanding Medicaid, and improving the quality and delivery of children’s health services.

We heard from experts in the field about the impact of perception, race, and bias on Medicaid, avenues for improving network adequacy, and the final Medicaid managed care regulations and what they mean for children and families.

HCFANY’s Children, Youth, and Families Task Force represented New York consumer advocates at the conference. HCFANY’s Elisabeth Benjamin, Vice President of Health Initiatives at the Community Service Society of New York, spoke on a panel that explored the means by which advocates can work to improve access to care in both public and private coverage programs.

CHP Picture

Last week, The Atlantic published an article entitled “The Unconscionable Difficulty of Getting Health Insurance for a Newborn.” The article tells the story of contributing writer Ester Bloom and her difficulties getting immediate Child Health Plus (CHP) insurance coverage for her newborn son. Coverage for Bloom’s son did not begin until six weeks after his birth, and in the interim she instead had to pay for much more expensive individual coverage through the Marketplace.

However, the original article neglected to mention the passage of Bill S4745/A7155 in December of 2015, which allows babies born into low and middle-income families eligible for Child Health Plus from the day they are born. Under this law, which takes effect January 1, 2017, parents who apply before the baby is born, or within 60 days of birth, will have CHP coverage for the newborn from the date of birth. Those who submit an application more than 60 days after the birth will be covered from the date of application. This law addresses the 45 day gap between parent application and newborn enrollment in CHP that Bloom describes in the article. For more details please see HCFANY’s original blog post from December 28, 2015.

We were excited to see a correction published on June 21, which included information about the law and how it will improve coverage for newborns under CHP.

This article also highlights the many challenges that consumers face when navigating the health insurance system as well as the importance of the trained assistance that health care Navigators, Certified Application Counselors, and Community Health Advocates can provide. New York State has been a leader in offering consumer assistance through these programs.

Parents who would like to enroll a child in CHP can do so through the New York State of Health Marketplace or by connecting to the Community Service Society Navigator Network at (888) 614-5400 or through their website.

 

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HCFANY worked hard on a series of important priorities this budget season, described in this policy brief.  The final enacted budget can be found here.

Here’s the quick summary of how we did:

Comprehensive coverage for immigrants

HCFANY Recommendation: Provide $10.3 million in State funding to offer Essential Plan (EP) to legal immigrants who are barred from federally-funded EP.

Result: Although the Assembly One House bill included the $10.3 million in State funding, the proposal did not make it in the final budget.sad face

Full funding for Community Health Advocates (CHA)

HCFANY Recommendation: Provide $4 million in funding for CHA to help people with their insurance problems and access to health care problems, when they occur.

Result: The final budget included $3.25 million for CHA–$2.5 million from the Executive and $750,000 from the Assembly.  Due to the intricacies of State contracting, this means that the CHA program faces an 18% cut from the past year.

Prior Approval of insurance plan rate increases

HCFANY Recommendation: Reject a Senate One House bill proposal to repeal the State’s right to review proposed insurance premium increases.

Result: The measure was not included in the enacted budget.1_emoji2

Health Guaranty Fund

HCFANY Recommendation: Support with modifications the Senate and Assembly stand-alone bill which sought to set up a Health Guaranty fund to reimburse providers in the wake of a health plan closing (e.g. Health Republic).

Result: The budget establishes a fund that will be financed through “settlement funds” to reimburse providers. The process for distributing the funds is unknown and it appears to include no public representation and/or public reporting on the distributions.sad face

Medicaid beneficiary protections

HCFANY Recommendation: HCFANY opposed the following threats to Medicaid beneficiaries: elimination of spousal/parental refusal, reduction of resources that spouses of people in MLTC or nursing homes can keep, and the repeal of “prescriber prevails.”

Result: None of these proposals made the final budget. That means spousal/parental refusal remains intact, spouses of people in MLTC or nursing homes will not see a cut in the amount of resources they can keep, and “prescriber prevails” will continue to be available in Medicaid. 1_emoji2

 

 

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Eighty representatives of HCFANY member groups gendand supporters came to Albany to network with other advocates, get updates on the fight for quality, affordable health care in New York, and plan strategy at HCFANY’s Annual Meeting on January 8.

Our guest speakers emphasized the continuing strong progress health reform is making, statewide and nationally.  Danielle Holahan, the Deputy Director of the NY State of Health, reported that the number of uninsured New Yorkers has declined by an estimated 700,000, lowering the uninsured rate to its lowest point in decades.  Jackie Cornell-Bechelli, the Regional Director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, similarly pointed to major gains in enrollment on the national level.

However, as a panel of HCFANY leaders emphasized, there’s still more work for us do to ensure that all New Yorkers have health insurance, that the coverage and care we receive is of high quality, and that consumers can effectively use their coverage.  They outlined HCFANY’s Legislative Agenda for 2016, including:

  • state funding for Community Health Advocates, a program that helps consumers understand and effectively use their coverage and access care;
  • the creation of a new program to fund community groups and small business-serving groups to do outreach to consumers in “hard to reach” communities; and
  • funding to cover a small group of New York immigrants who are lawful residents but not covered under the new Essential Plan.

In the afternoon, participants broke into Planning Groups to develop strong campaigns to take action on HCFANY’s priority 2016 issues.  At the immigrant coverage breakout, advocates discussed the name and structure of this exciting new campaign and new partners we should reach out to. The outreach and consumer assistance breakout discussed best practices for reaching the uninsured.  The network adequacy group identified issues relating to network adequacy that diverse communities in New York experience, including rural communities and artists.  Finally, the payment and delivery system reform breakout talked about opportunities to bring consumer voices into the state’s transformation efforts, including organizing a caucus of consumer advocates participating in the payment and delivery system reform workgroups.

For more information on any of these initiatives, please contact Carrie Tracy at ctracy@cssny.org.