What’s new on the NY State of Health Marketplace?

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With open enrollment just over a month away, the New York State Marketplace has been adding some new and noteworthy features. Many of these are geared toward improving outreach and enrollment efforts to reach the remaining uninsured in New York. About 2.7 million New Yorkers were uninsured before the Marketplace launch. Over 1.4 million had enrolled in plans by the end of August, over 80 percent of whom were uninsured when they application.

In other words, we’ve made incredible progress. And there’s still work to do.

With that in mind, here are a few things to check out:

Events calendar for enrollment assistance 

New Yorkers who are looking to learn more about their options and enroll now have one more way to find certified assistors. The Marketplace now has an interactive events calendar where assistors are posting everything from free health insurance workshops to tabling at community events. Upcoming highlights are a Harvest Festival in Walden (October 4) and a Diwali festival in Hicksville (October 12). An interactive map allows people to search by region.

Enrollment demographics by county and zipcode

New county-by-county enrollment data is now available on the Marketplace website. Click on a county to view enrollment data by type of program, percentage of enrollees who were uninsured at the time of application, race/ethnicity, gender, and age. This new data will help advocates and community-based organizations target outreach efforts in the coming months.

Data is also available down to the zipcode level by type of program. You can view data for up to 10 zipcodes at once by using their new tool here.

Coming soon…the NY State of Health Marketplace in Spanish

Marketplace Executive Director Donna Frescatore announced at recent the Regional Outreach and Enrollment Summits that a Spanish-language version of the NY State of Health website will be available in time for this year’s open enrollment launch on November 15. Last year’s enrollment of Spanish speaking New Yorkers was three times lower than the Urban Institute’s 2013 enrollment projections. Hopefully the new website helps to boost those numbers.

Urban Institute Projections vs. NY State of Health (NYSOH) Actual Enrollment by Language 

enrollment by language

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Outreach Worker Engracia Jamieson and Volunteer Jan Kenyon at Great Day in Harlem  (above) and   RWV-NY Community Organizer Liza Lederer (right) at Brooklyn Pride

This coming Labor Day Weekend marks the unofficial end of summer, and it’s been a busy one for health coverage advocates and volunteers! Here’s an update from the field from the Get Covered NY Campaign, a grassroots effort to raise awareness about the new insurance options available through NY State of Health, and help NYC residents get covered. Get Covered NY is a project of Health Care For All New York, Greater NYC for Change, and Raising Women’s Voices – NY.

Guest Post by Aliza Lederer-Plaskett, Community Organizer for Raising Women’s Voices-NY

Raising Women’s Voices and our partners in the Get Covered NY initiative are wrapping up a busy summer of outreach to uninsured New Yorkers. We have tabled and leafleted at a wide variety of events in low-income communities in Upper Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx, as well as Westchester and Rockland counties.

We’ve been to the Hunts Point Summer Fish Festival in the Bronx. We’ve reached out to LGBT people by tabling at Pride Festivals in Harlem, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Rockland County and lower Manhattan. We’ve been to book fairs, Harlem Week and back-to-school events where we can reach families with children who may be eligible for Child Health Plus. In Westchester and Rockland Counties, we have done outreach at cultural festivals and presentations on the Affordable Care Act and NY State of Health for members and staff of local nonprofit organizations.

Our dedicated and trained Get Covered New York volunteers have been taking clipboards and handouts around the events, interacting with attendees and taking down the names of people who would like to be contacted by a Navigator to begin the application process. Through this hands-on approach, we have collected more than 900 names of uninsured and underinsured individuals throughout July and August.

As we speak with uninsured people in the field and collect their information, we have noted who has experienced a major life change – which may qualify them for a special open enrollment period. We also flag people who we think might qualify for Medicaid, for which there is year-round enrollment. We then forward their contact information directly to a Navigator at the Community Service Society.  Other uninsured individuals are entered into the Get Covered NY database, to be called by volunteers at phone banks that will start up again as the November 15 start of the next open enrollment period draws closer.

We have begun to pack our September and October schedule chock full of community events to ensure that we can reach as many people as possible prior to the start of the new enrollment period.  Got an event you’d like to see us at?  Interested in becoming a volunteer? Please contact Liza Lederer at liza@raisingwomensvoices.net and we’ll get you set up to help get New York covered!

My Files

The New York State Department of Financial Services is currently reviewing insurance companies’ rates for the coming year, 2015. Overall this year, 11 insurers asked for rate increases and four asked for decreases. You can read insurer rate applications here. Members of the public have the chance to comment on the rates. HCFANY recently submitted seven letters about these plans:

Aetna Health

Empire HealthChoice

Excellus Health Plan

Health Republic Insurance of New York

Metro Plus Health Plan

Oscar Insurance Corporation

United Healthcare

2014 insurance rates on NY State of Health, our State’s health plan Marketplace, declined by 53%. These affordable rates were an important reason for the enrollment of over one million New Yorkers. The Department of Financial Services has an important role in ensuring that health plan rate increases are in line with actual medical cost changes, and that rates remain as affordable as possible for consumers.

HCFANY’s comments first discuss the broader context that the Department should consider and then additional specific carrier issues. In addressing the broader context, HCFANY notes:

  1. Health care costs have been rising at slower rates for the past several years, and have been under 10% for the last 12, according to National Health Expenditures data. The California Marketplace held health insurers to a maximum 4.2% increase for 2015.
  2. It’s reasonable to expect the 2015 risk pool will be healthier than 2014, because less healthy consumers are likely to have already enrolled.
  3. The ACA “risk” programs should mean lower risk for insurers and lower prices for consumers. The ACA includes special programs – risk adjustment, risk corridor, and reinsurance programs – to compensate insurers for any increased risk they take on as a result of new enrollees. The programs were designed specifically to ensure stable insurance rates for consumers.
  4. Insurers should have lower administrative costs as a result of the ACA. Significant money and energy is being put into marketing and outreach for health insurance because of the ACA, which means insurers can spend less time and money marketing their products.

The Department of Financial Services should post the final rates sometime in the early fall.

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Guest post: Jessie Kavanagh, Health Policy Intern at Community Service Society of New York

Last week, a 3-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled 2-1 that states using the federally-facilitated marketplace (healthcare.gov) cannot offer government subsidies to their residents. The same day, a 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Virginia unanimously came to the opposite conclusion– that the states using the federal marketplace should be able to offer subsidies.

What to make of this conflict? Regardless of the disagreement, the bottom line for New Yorkers is simple: the decisions have no immediate impact on New Yorkers’ eligibility for the ACA tax credits and subsidies.

The main issue in these cases concerns the language in the ACA regarding the subsidies. The language states that subsidies are only available “through an exchange [aka marketplace] established by the state.” The U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit argued that this language means subsidies should be available only to people who enroll through a state-based marketplace. However, the 4th Circuit Court said that the law was ambiguous, and that the IRS was entitled to its interpretation that the federal marketplace acts as a state’s marketplace, and therefore all states can offer subsidies to their residents.

Ultimately, the ACA was written with the intent to make insurance more affordable for all Americans. And, it seems to be working. In New York, 3 out of 4 enrollees in commercial Qualified Health Plans during open enrollment- or 274,247 New Yorkers – were eligible for tax credits that made insurance more affordable.