HCFANY’s Executive Budget Update: What We Won and What We Lost.

 

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HCFANY worked hard on a series of important priorities this budget season, described in this policy brief.  The final enacted budget can be found here.

Here’s the quick summary of how we did:

Comprehensive coverage for immigrants

HCFANY Recommendation: Provide $10.3 million in State funding to offer Essential Plan (EP) to legal immigrants who are barred from federally-funded EP.

Result: Although the Assembly One House bill included the $10.3 million in State funding, the proposal did not make it in the final budget.sad face

Full funding for Community Health Advocates (CHA)

HCFANY Recommendation: Provide $4 million in funding for CHA to help people with their insurance problems and access to health care problems, when they occur.

Result: The final budget included $3.25 million for CHA–$2.5 million from the Executive and $750,000 from the Assembly.  Due to the intricacies of State contracting, this means that the CHA program faces an 18% cut from the past year.

Prior Approval of insurance plan rate increases

HCFANY Recommendation: Reject a Senate One House bill proposal to repeal the State’s right to review proposed insurance premium increases.

Result: The measure was not included in the enacted budget.1_emoji2

Health Guaranty Fund

HCFANY Recommendation: Support with modifications the Senate and Assembly stand-alone bill which sought to set up a Health Guaranty fund to reimburse providers in the wake of a health plan closing (e.g. Health Republic).

Result: The budget establishes a fund that will be financed through “settlement funds” to reimburse providers. The process for distributing the funds is unknown and it appears to include no public representation and/or public reporting on the distributions.sad face

Medicaid beneficiary protections

HCFANY Recommendation: HCFANY opposed the following threats to Medicaid beneficiaries: elimination of spousal/parental refusal, reduction of resources that spouses of people in MLTC or nursing homes can keep, and the repeal of “prescriber prevails.”

Result: None of these proposals made the final budget. That means spousal/parental refusal remains intact, spouses of people in MLTC or nursing homes will not see a cut in the amount of resources they can keep, and “prescriber prevails” will continue to be available in Medicaid. 1_emoji2

 

capitolHCFANY leaders are heading to the State Capitol today to speak to legislative leaders about our 2016 Policy Agenda. Here are a few of HCFANY’s ideas for ways that New York can continue to build on our successes to increase access to affordable quality health care for all.

Comprehensive Coverage for All Immigrants: New York can offer Essential Plan (EP) coverage for the roughly 5,500 New Yorkers who are ineligible for federal EP funding because of their immigration status by allocating $10.3 million in state-only funding for next year. New York should also explore ways to cover all immigrants, including those who are undocumented.

Consumer Assistance:  Community Health Advocates (CHA) helps New Yorkers understand, use and keep their insurance by providing a central, toll-free helpline and community and small business-serving agencies throughout the State. Last year, New York provided $3 million in funding for a 9-month period. This year, New York should provide $4 million to ensure a year-round CHA program.

Consumer Outreach:  While New York has exceeded enrollment expectations, 8% of New Yorkers remain uninsured. New York should build on its success by providing $2 million in funding for outreach and education by community-based organizations (CBOs) and small business-serving groups to reach the remaining uninsured. You can read more about these ideas in HCFANY’s Legislative Agenda Policy Brief and HCFANY Health/Medicaid Testimony on the 2016-2017 NYS Executive Budget.

@mx_214The ACA has helped New York close the coverage gap by enrolling over 2.7 million New Yorkers into coverage. But some New Yorkers remain ineligible for these new options for affordable coverage because of immigration status limitations on affordability programs.

The Community Service Society, a HCFANY Steering Committee member, released a new report today that offers an in-depth analysis of costs, eligibility and coverage options related to providing affordable and high-quality health insurance to nearly a half million unauthorized immigrants living in New York who are uninsurable due to their immigration status.

The paper, “How New York Can Provide Health Coverage to its Uninsured Immigrant Residents,” describes three coverage options that would improve health coverage for a vulnerable segment of the state’s population while also closing the coverage gap left by the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Despite the state’s expansive public insurance programs, there are as many as 457,000 unauthorized immigrants ineligible for coverage. Uninsured people are more likely to get sick and even die younger, and the cost of care can mean financial ruin for uninsured families. Treating uninsured patients also strains the budgets of community health care providers that treat them.

The policy paper investigates three coverage options that would extend health insurance to between 90,100 and 241,600 immigrants New Yorkers who are ineligible for Medicaid and Marketplace coverage due to their immigration status. Funding even the most ambitious of these proposals would result in a less than one percent increase in the state’s health budget of roughly $65 billion.

The report also points out a more modest policy fix that New York could enact this year, while the State considers the more comprehensive options outlined in the report. This option, the Essential Plan “Clean Up,” would extend Essential Plan coverage to about 5,500 lawful immigrants in New York with immigration statuses that would make them eligible for Medicaid in New York, but not for the federally-funded Essential Plan. These New Yorkers include young adults who qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status, also known as the Dreamers.

 

A report released this week by Kaiser Family Foundation shows that 58% of uninsured New Yorkers are eligible for free or subsidized health coverage. The majority of them – 548,000 people – are eligible but not enrolled in Medicaid. There are several reasons why people who are eligible for Medicaid have not enrolled: some do not know they’re now eligible under the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion, some avoid Medicaid because of the stigma of poverty attached to the program, and some have had their income drop since they last applied for coverage.

The 317,000 New Yorkers who are uninsured but would qualify for financial assistance (such as Cost Sharing Reductions and Advance Premium Tax Credits) on the Marketplace includes consumers who are newly-eligible for the Essential Plan, New York’s forthcoming Basic Health Program. Consumers enrolled in the Essential Plan will have monthly premiums of $0 or $20 a month, no deductible, and very low copays; this combination should assuage the fears of people who believe health coverage is too expensive. The New York State of Health hopes to draw consumers back during the third Open Enrollment period, which begins on November 1, by highlighting these new levels of affordability. They’ll be targeting these 317,000 New Yorkers with videos, social media campaigns, and catchy new graphics (stay tuned for more!).

Nearly a third of uninsured New Yorkers – 457,000 people – are unauthorized immigrants. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s recent announcement on connecting immigrants to care through a “Direct Access” program was a crucial first step for those immigrants living in the City, and Health Care for All New York will continue to advocate for comprehensive health insurance coverage for our undocumented neighbors. New York State has done a fabulous job in the first two Open Enrollment periods in connecting people to coverage, and the rollout of the Essential Plan will be another step in the right direction. A critical next step for closing the coverage gap in New York will be expanding affordable coverage to New Yorkers who are excluded from coverage options because of immigration status.